fill
1082_7980_Temp31-bannerbar
1082_7991_Temp31-sublogo
1082_7996_Temp31-navstretch
fill
fill
fill
Kathy Hullings
fill
(856) 905-5011
fill
fill
fill
fill
fill
fill
fill
fill
Buyer FAQs
fill
Home Purchase Guide
fill
Home-Buying Mistakes
fill
Seller FAQs
fill
Selling for Top Dollar!
fill
Selling First Impressions
fill
Real Estate Glossary
fill
About Weichert
fill
fill
fill
fill
fill fill
HOUSE NUMBER
fill fill
fill fill fill fill
fill
and/or
fill fill fill
fill
STREET NAME
fill fill fill
fill fill fill
fill
CITY
fill fill fill
fill fill fill
fill
ZIP CODE
fill fill fill
fill fill fill
fill
MLS NUMBER
fill fill fill
fill
You can enter multiple MLS Numbers separated by a comma.
fill fill
fill fill fill
fill fill

 Seller FAQs

“Questions that sellers frequently ask us.”

Q.  Why shouldn’t I price my house a little high, since I can always drop the price later?

A. That’s a strategy that sounds good – but, in fact, is more likely to result in a lower price. Here’s why. The first few weeks a house is on the market is when it will have the most activity. If a house is overpriced, it has to compete with houses at that higher price level, which are almost certainly larger or have newer/more luxurious features.

So the overpriced home is unlikely to attract an offer. Worse yet, those first weeks are when real estate agents preview the house. If it’s overpriced, they may not even bother to show it to their buyers. Eventually, the seller will have to drop the price – and may end up with an even lower price because buyers will wonder why the house has been on the market so long and may factor that into their offer.

Q. What is meant by the term “contingency” in a sales contract?

A. Sales contracts typically contain several “contingency” clauses, or stipulations that the sale is subject to. For example, with a mortgage contingency, if the buyer is unable to obtain financing within the specified timeframe, neither the buyer nor the seller is required to complete the purchase. Among other common provisions in the “subject to” section are termite and other inspection issues and the purchaser’s need to sell a current home first.

Q. What is an escape clause?

A. An escape clause, also known as a kickout or knockout clause, is a provision that allows the party to void the contract. For example, the seller may retain the right to look for a more favorable offer, with the original purchaser retaining the right, if challenged, either to firm up the first sales contract (such as by waiving a contingency) or to void the contract. As another example, sellers might insist upon an escape clause in a contract that hinges on the buyers’ selling their home.

fill fill
fill

Buyer FAQs  |  Home Purchase Guide  |  Home-Buying Mistakes  |  Seller FAQs  |  Selling for Top Dollar!  |  Selling First Impressions  |  Real Estate Glossary  |  About Weichert

© 2016 Weichert Realtors. All rights reserved.

If your home is currently listed with a real estate broker, this is not intended to be a solicitation of the listing. Each WEICHERT ® franchised office is independently owned and operated. Weichert® is a federally registered trademark owned by Weichert Co. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. REALTOR® is a federally registered collective membership mark which identifies a real estate professional who is a Member of the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® and subscribes to its strict Code of Ethics.
fill
fill
fill